Lab Members

CogMem Lab

Director

Have you ever forgotten someone’s name? It sure can be frustrating … but also fascinating! How do we remember and why do we forget? These are the kind of questions that we like to ask through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of people’s brains. 

 

For all of its frailty, memory has always fascinated me. In my graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania, I used fMRI and other techniques to study language, working memory, and cognitive control. In my postdoctoral work at Princeton University, I developed computational approaches to fMRI analysis in order to study memory in the context of vision, learning, and prediction. Now I’m very excited to collaborate on new projects to discover the neural mechanisms for chemotherapy-related memory impairment, and to help develop a state-of-the-art interface for visualizing fMRI data on top the complex neuroanatomy that maintains everything we remember. I couldn’t be more thrilled to join the University of Louisville and the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences! Please stop by my office or send me an email so that we can chat!

Nicholas Hindy, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Director, Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory Lab

Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

University of Louisville

Office: Davidson 203a

Email          CV

(502) 852-6197

Full-Time Staff

I work as a joint Research Technologist at CogMem lab and the Human Cognitive Neurophysiology lab in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Louisville Hospital.  My primary research focus at CogMem lab relates to the cognitive psychology of human memory and how sleep affects memory and we study this using behavioral and fMRI techniques. I am also a TA for a MATLAB - oriented Computer Programming course.

Prior to joining UofL, I completed my Master of Science in Chemical and Biological Engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo where I did stem cell research. 

 

I intend to pursue a graduate program in the Cognitive Sciences to explore the interaction between memory, sleep and dreams.

Feel free to contact me to learn more about the work we do here!

Surya Rajan Selvam, M.S.

Research Technologist

Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Department of Neurological Surgery

University of Louisville

Office: Davidson 203b

Email          CV

Graduate Students

I am in my third year as a Ph.D. student in the Experimental Psychology program. Aside from my work in the CogMem lab, I am also a Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) for the department. I am currently a GTA for PSYC 302 - Experimental Psychology/Research Methods. Primarily, I am interested in lines of research related to the neuroscience of memory, especially in instances where our memory fails us. 

 

Before joining the department, I completed my Master of Science in Psychological Science at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky. During my time at WKU, I primarily focused on research pertaining to false memories/suggestibility, eyewitness memory, and metacognition. I also completed my Bachelor of Science in Psychology, with minors in Biology and Chemistry, at Berry College in Rome, Georgia. While I was at Berry, my research was focused on work examining high school students with intellectual disabilities.

If you have any questions about what is going on in the lab or would like more specific information on our current projects, please do not hesitate to contact me or stop by my office! 

 

 

William B. Corley, M.S.

Experimental Psychology Ph.D. Student

Graduate Teaching Assistant

Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

University of Louisville

Office: Davidson 203b

Email          CV

I am in my first year as a PhD student at Louisville. Fresh out of undergraduate studies, I completed my Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at Bellarmine University, where I conducted research on consciousness, specifically looking into awareness of implicit processes. An interesting finding of that research drew me into the fascinating world of false memory research. My current research investigates the replay and consolidation of those false memories. I have interests in expanding my research to investigate metamemory and consciousness in the future.

Feel free to contact me or stop by my office if you have any questions!

Ryan P. Coleman, B.A.

Experimental Psychology PhD Student

Graduate Research Assistant

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

University of Louisville

Office: Davidson 203b

Email       

Manal Zafar, B.S.

Experimental Psychology Ph.D. Student

Graduate Teaching Assistant 

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

University of Louisville

Office: Davidson 203B

Email

I am a first year international graduate student in the Experimental Psychology program. I’m interested in the neural correlates of memory, especially the role that it plays in childhood development. At CogMem I’m currently working on studying early number sense in Pre-K and Kindergarten students in collaboration with the Education Department. Specifically, I aim to understand and answer questions related to how children quantify and process numbers using fMRI techniques and behavioral observations. My future goals are to further expand questions on what children remember, how they remember and how that shapes them.

 

Apart from my research, I am also a Graduate Teaching Assistant at U of L. I completed my Bachelors in Science in Applied Psychology (2017) from Beaconhouse National University in Lahore, Pakistan. My undergraduate thesis explored Self-Compassion, its relation to perceived Parental Acceptance/Rejection and Personality Traits in adolescents. After this, I briefly worked with autistic children as a Behavior Interventionist, before joining U of L.  

 

If you have any further questions about CogMem and the work we do, please don’t hesitate to reach out; send me an email or drop by!

Research Assistants

Mazura Ibragimova

Kugen Naidoo

Ramya Naraharisetty

Sophie Inoshita

Ailen Sanchez

Komal Gondal

Michelle Truax

Aubrey Sledge

Faylinn Barnhart

Alumni

Kathryn Mattingly